History’s Worst Decisions – Stephen Weir

History's Worst Decisions - Stephen WeirThey claim that it’s wrong to laugh at other people’s misfortunes. But let’s be honest – we all love it when someone cocks something up. Dennis Norden has made an entire career out of it. Perhaps it’s something about the British sense of humour that enables us to laugh at ourselves? Throughout history, people have for various reasons made appallingly bad decisions. Sometimes on a monumental scale. Stephen Weir’s History’s Worst Decisions is an entertaining examination of some of the most infamous of these.

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Ruso and the Root of All Evils - R S Downie

Ruso and the Root of All Evils - R S DownieFor the sequel to Ruso and the Disappearing Dancing Girls and Ruso and the Demented Doctor, R S Downie gives us Ruso and the Root of All Evils which follows its predecessors (both of which were bestsellers) admirably. Following his previous adventures, our protagonist is content in his life in Britannia with his slave (and lover), Tilla. Content that is until he is called back to Gaul on urgent family business, the details of which are not immediately apparent.

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Slaughter on a Snowy Morn - Colin Evans

Slaughter On A Snowy Morn - Colin EvansThere are few better stories in the true crime genre than that of the miscarriage of justice being overturned at the very last minute and resulting the true culprit being brought to account. When the evidence that enables this to happen is generated by what is effectively the very birth of the forensic techniques we now take for granted, the story of Charlie Stielow, told in Colin Evans’ Slaughter on a Snowy Morn becomes an even more tantalising prospect.

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The Smell of the Continent - Richard Mullen and James Munson

The Smell of the Continent - Richard Mullen and James MunsonWith its proximity to Great Britain, and the sheer amount to see and do, Europe was always going to become a prime tourist destination for the English. But the concept of tourism is a (fairly) recent invention that is barely recognisable today from its roots in the "Grand Tour". Some things however, have not changed and Richard Mullen and James Munson examine various aspects of what can effectively be called the birth of British tourism on the continent in their superb "The Smell of the Continent" - The British Discover Europe.

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